Aussies Buying Guns on Dark Web, Czechs Get Gun Rights

Gun runners are bringing in illegal arms and explosives by the 1000s. Meanwhile, Czechoslovakia is changing its constitution to allow citizens to defend against terrorism.

Even with a near total gun ban in Australia, criminals are still able to get guns, and grenades, apparently.
Even with a near total gun ban in Australia, criminals are still able to get guns, and grenades, apparently.photo from dailymail.com

As one of the architects of Australia's extremely stringent gun control laws warns the nation against allowing them to be loosened, the Daily Mail reports that thousands of Australians are buying guns and even grenades on the dark web, which are snuck into the country by black market gun runners, usually by mail.

[The story says] The story says research gathered by RAND Europe found that Australians are buying and selling guns and explosives, as well as downloading instructions on how to make bombs, from overseas sellers in Asia, Canada, South America, and the United States.

Australian citizens are accessing 12 main crypto markets (encrypted black market websites) with 167,000 illegal product listings, the story says.

“Prices range from $218 for a second-hand pistol to $2495 for a sub-machine gun.

“Sellers reportedly employ 'special shipping techniques' to avoid detection such as taking the weapons apart and shipping the pieces in different parcels.

“Another popular method for disguising firearm postage is to hide the parts inside electronics such as televisions or printers…

“The report surmised that the most popular item on the black market is are guns, followed by instruction manuals explaining how to 'manufacture firearms and instructions on how to print guns at home using 3D printers' which can  be purchased for as little as $1.30.”

Also in the Australian news, guns.com reports that gun rights activists there have raised $21,000 to help a farmer get back his firearms and gun license, which were taken after after he used an unloaded gun to protect his family against a knife-wielding trespasser.

David Dunstan encountered the trespasser, who was at his back door with a club and a knife. He used an unloaded .22-caliber rifle to convince the man to get back in his car as Dunstan's wife called the police.

Police later came and arrested Dunstan in his driveway and later returned to confiscate his rifle. No charges against him have been filed, but his limited gun rights have not been restored, the story says.

Meanwhile, in Czechoslovakia, the lower house of parliament has agreed to alter the constitution so that firearms can be held legally by citizens when national security is threatened. The amendment gives Czechs the right to use firearms during terrorist attacks, according to this story from bbc.com.

“It was passed by the lower house by a big majority, and is likewise expected to be approved by the upper house.

“The move by parliament is a challenge to EU gun control rules which restrict civilians from possessing certain kinds of semi-automatic weapons.

“The EU argues its move is a much-needed counter-terrorism measure.

“But the Czech parliament took a different view, arguing that allowing people to bear arms enables them to defend themselves against terrorism.

“‘We don't want to disarm our citizens at a time when the security situation in Europe is getting worse,’ Interior Minister Milan Chovanec told parliament on Wednesday.

“’Show me a single terrorist attack in Europe perpetrated using a legally-owned weapon.’”