New Bill Would Nix Gun Lawsuit Regulations

The Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, passed in 2005, protects gun makers and dealers from lawsuits over crimes committed with firearms.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal and two other senators introduced the legislation that would reverse protections for the gun industry against lawsuits regarding crimes committed with their products after purc
Sen. Richard Blumenthal and two other senators introduced the legislation that would reverse protections for the gun industry against lawsuits regarding crimes committed with their products after purchase.photo from washingtonexaminer.com

Not only was a measure introduced in the House yesterday that would ban the now-controversial bump stocks, Democrats on Capitol Hill announced a proposal the same day, that would repeal the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act.

According to this story from guns.com, the measure (titled The Equal Access to Justice for Victims of Gun Violence Act), introduced in the Senate by Connecticut lawmaker Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy and in the House by California Rep. Adam Schiff and Connecticut Rep. Elizabeth Esty, would strip the 10-year-old safeguard passed by Congress "that insulates the gun industry from frivolous lawsuits."

"Making the gun industry immune from lawsuits effectively handed them a license to kill," said Murphy in a statement. "Toy manufacturers are held legally responsible if their neglect or irresponsibility hurts people, so why on earth aren't gun manufacturers."

The PLCAA was signed by George W. Bush in October 2005, after passing through Congress by more than a 2-to-1 margin.

The act specifically disallows lawful firearms manufacturers and dealers from being held liable for negligence when crimes have been committed with their products.

The story says an identical measure was filed last year by the same set of lawmakers. It failed to move out of committee.

Gun industry trade groups say the PLCAA is needed to protect against junk lawsuits designed to run gunmakers and dealers out of business.

The Act still allows for legitimate liability claims, like in the case of a defective product.