California Releases Personal Info of Firearms Instructors

California Releases Personal Info of Firearms Instructors
More than 3500 instructors now need to take action to prevent identity theft, because the info was "accidentally" released by the state. photo from americanmilitarynews.comweb photo

When a Southern California Public Radio (KPCC) reporter filed a Freedom of Information Act request seeking information on state Firearms Safety Certifications, the answer included the personal information of about 3,500 firearms instructors residing in California.

According to this story from americanmilitarynews.com, the state Department of Justice said the information, which includes dates of birth, driver's license numbers, and state ID numbers, was released "accidentally."

California Attorney General Kamala Harris warned the instructors to place a fraud alert on their credit to stop any identity theft that could inadvertently occur, the story says.

The story says the NRA-ILA is demanding answers on why it took so long for the instructors to be notified.

The DOJ informed the instructors of the breach by mail, about two months after the information was first released.

“This privacy breach is just another example of the California Department of Justice’s disregard for the rights of gun owners. There is no reason why the private information of firearms instructors should have been released—the DOJ redacts information all the time,” said NRA_ILA’s Jennifer Baker in the story.

California has the most oppressive gun laws in the nation and has put several bans in place. We reported last month that the state saw an 18-year-high in long-gun sales ahead of laws that go into effect this year that ban almost all AR-platform rifles, along with many other semi-auto rifles with detachable magazines, by banning the so-called "bullet button."

Starting this month, the state also mandates current owners to either register their now illegal firearms, sell them across state lines, or turn bullet-button long guns over to law enforcement.

NICS background checks will also be required in California for every single ammunition purchase, and any magazines that hold more than 10 rounds are completely banned, including grandfathered magazines.