Federal Court Upholds NY SAFE Act

It also ruled for similar laws in Connecticut, but found some provisions unconstitutional.

It also ruled for similar laws in Connecticut, but found some provisions unconstitutional.
It also ruled for similar laws in Connecticut, but found some provisions unconstitutional.web photo

A federal appeals court has upheld New York's controversial control law known as The SAFE Act, though the court did agree with lower courts that a few provisions exceeded the state's authority, says this story from democratandchronicle.com.

The decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit found that the SAFE Act in New York, and other laws in Connecticut passed after the Newtown shooting in 2012, don't violate the Second Amendment, as gunrights advocates contended in their lawsuit.

"We hold that the core provisions of the New York and Connecticut laws prohibiting possession of semiautomatic assault weapons and large-capacity magazines do not violate the Second Amendment, and that the challenged individual provisions are not void for vagueness," the ruling said.

However, the court found that New York's requirement that only seven bullets be loaded in a 10-round magazine is unconstitutional, upholding a previous court ruling. New York agreed not to enforce the seven-bullet limit based on that earlier decision.

The court said the seven-round limit would be difficult to enforce, as most firearms companies don't make magazines that only hold seven rounds.

"New York has failed to present evidence that the mere existence of this load limit will convince any would-be malefactors to load magazines capable of holding ten rounds with only the permissible seven," the ruling says.

In Connecticut, the court ruled against a provision that prohibits the ownership of a slide-action Remington 7615.

The state Rifle & Pistol Association vowed to take the case to the U.S. Supreme Court.