F

or the first Mission: Impossible sequel, Tom Cruise returned as Ethan Hunt opposite Anthony Hopkins with the hot-at-the-time action director John Woo at the helm, lending his signature over-the-top physics-be-damned action style to the movie. M:I2 was a departure from the original’s tense, high-tech espionage atmosphere and plot of the original, and was instead a popcorn flick rife with car chases, wild shootouts, and motorcycle stunts.

This time, instead of being a part of a team, Hunt operates more like a well-armed super-spy. And, since it's a John Woo movie, he spends an amount of time...probably too long, shooting two pistols at the same time. Let's check out the hardware:

Ethan Hunt

Beretta 92FS Brigadier - Beretta 92FS Compact

Hunt shoots two Beretta 92FS Brigadier pistols.
Hunt shoots two Beretta 92FS Brigadier pistols.photo from imfdb.org

Woo loves him some dual-wielded pistols, and Hunt indeeds shoots both the 92 Compact and a Beretta 92FS Brigadier with Hogue rubber grips akimbo in the film. He carriest the Brigadier model pistol in a shoulder holster and the Compact on his hip. The Brigadier is later used by Sean Ambrose (Dougray Scott) during his final confrontation with Hunt.

Beretta 92 Compact
In the MI sequel, Ethan Hunt also uses a Beretta 92 Compact.photo from imfdb.org

Above we get a good look at Hunt's Beretta 92FS Brigadier, which he carries in a lefty Galco SOB holster, that allows him to draw it with his weak-side hand.

Hunt fires his Beretta 92FS Brigadier behind him, aiming with the side mirror on the moving motorcycle, and actually hits something.
Hunt fires his Beretta 92FS Brigadier behind him, aiming with the side mirror on the moving motorcycle, and actually hits something.photo from imfdb.org

And just to prove the John Woo-y-ness of this movie, above is a screenshot of Hunt shooting dudes behind him, from a moving motorcycle, using the side-view mirror to aim his Beretta 92 Compact, which is a scaled down version of the company’s 92FS pistol.

Heckler & Koch USP Compact

Hunt fires a Heckler & Koch USP Compact from his back.
Hunt fires a Heckler & Koch USP Compact from his back.photo from imfdb.org

An H&K USP Compact is carried by Sean Ambrose (Dougray Scott) as a backup weapon, along with his Sphinx AT 2000. It is dropped in the sand when Hunt and Ambrose jump from their motorcycles to engage in hand to hand combat, and later used by Hunt.

The full-sized USP had been in plenty of movies at this point, but Mission: Impossible II is the first known movie appearance of the USP Compact.

For those watching carefully, it may seem that the USP Compact kind of appears out of nowhere. Ambrose is never shown carrying or drawing the gun in the final cut of the movie, but in the script, Ambrose is supposed to draw his backup USP-C after losing his Sphinx AT 2000 and point it at Hunt, who then charges at him, sending them both falling from the rock to the beach below, where Ambrose drops the USP, allowing Hunt to pick it up.

And of course, he couldn't just pick it up—Hunt kicks up the bad guy’s Heckler & Koch USP Compact from the sand, catches it in mid air, dives and shoots. Yep, that’s Woo.

BioCyte Guards - MP5A2

A number of guards are armed with MP5A2 submachine guns.
A number of guards are armed with MP5A2 submachine guns.photo from imfdb.org

Most of the BioCyte security guards and some of Ambrose's men carry the MP5A2 submachine gun. These look to be genuine MP5s, and not civilian models modified to fire full auto that you see in so many movies. You can tell because the submachine guns in this movie have the magazine release lever located behind the magwell instead of the button type of mag release on the civvy model.

SA Vz.61 Skorpion

The Skorpion is a Czechoslovak made 7.65mm machine pistol first made in the 1950s.
The Skorpion is a Czechoslovak made 7.65mm machine pistol first made in the 1950s.photo from imfdb.org

One of Ambrose's men fires a SA Vz.61 Skorpion at Hunt during the final chase. The Skorpion is a Czechoslovak made 7.65mm machine pistol developed in 1959 by Miroslav Rybář and produced under the official designation Samopal vzor 61 ("submachine gun model 1961") by the Česká zbrojovka arms factory in Uherský Brod from 1961 to 1979.

Although it was developed for use with security forces and special forces, the weapon was also accepted into service with the Czechoslovak Army, as a personal sidearm for lower-ranking army staff, vehicle drivers, armored vehicle personnel and special forces.

Colt 9mm Submachine Gun

Luther (Ving Rhames) fires a Colt 9mm Submachine Gun from a helicopter.
Luther (Ving Rhames) fires a Colt 9mm Submachine Gun from a helicopter.photo from imfdb.org

Luther (Ving Rhames) uses a Colt 9mm Submachine Gun fitted with a C-More sight mounted in front of the carrying handle and a M16/AR15 brass catcher when firing from the helicopter during the final chase.

The Colt 9mm SMG is a closed bolt, blowback operated submachine gun, rather than the conventional direct impingement gas operation of the standard 5.56×45mm M16 type rifle and its variants.

Because it fires from a closed bolt, the Colt SMG is more accurate than open bolt submachine guns in 9mm like the IMI UZI.

DPMS M-37 Flare Launcher as Grenade Launcher

When his submachine gun isn't enough, Luther pulls out a DPMS M-37 that fires 40mm grenades.
When his submachine gun isn't enough, Luther pulls out a DPMS M-37 that fires 40mm grenades.photo from imfdb.org

Showing he's prepared for anything, once his helicopter starts taking fire from the ground, he drops the Colt SMG and picks up a DPMS M-37 Flare Launcher, which is depicted as firing 40mm HE grenades instead of the 37mm gas/flare ammo it's made for.

The launcher is designed to mount on an AR lower—in the movie, it's mounted on an M4-type lower, with a telescoping stock and a C-MORR sight mounted on the receiver. The launcher is a single-shot, break-action design.