How to Customize a Savage AccuFit Stock

The AccuStock lets you tailor fit a rifle to your frame without the cost of a pricey adjustable stock.

I poo-poo’d the Savage’s new custom fit AccuFit stock when it came out early this year. I’m 5’ 9” of medium build, and I’ve yet to find a rifle off-the -shelf that fit me so poorly I couldn’t hunt with it. Then in Wyoming this year I customized a .25-06 by just slightly raising the cheek piece. I found I was faster on the scope when bringing the gun up to rest and now I’m playing around with after-market cheek risers on my fleet of rifles back home to test the theory.

A Day At The Range

What really sold me on the Savage system came a few weeks later, when my buddy’s wife wanted to shoot. The .25-06 was out and dialed in, and the quarter-bore felt like a respectable deer-killing round for her to try.

The gun was long for her 5’ 2” self, so in about 10 minutes we fit the AccuFit stock to her, and she was happily sending lead down range. Hell, it was such a successful shoot that she even saved the shells from “the biggest rifle,” she’d ever fired.

Had we not been able to fit the gun to her, I don’t know if it would have worked out so well. If anything, there was immense value in making the experience so personal with a tailored rifle.

For getting a new short (or very tall) shooter into a rifle, a better fit is an enormous benefit. With the AccuFit system, you could get a kid a legendary Savage 110 that they could use their whole life, the rifle literally growing with them.

How It Works

AccuStock
The AccuStock includes a number of LOP spacers and different sized cheek rests for adjustable comb height.Savage Arms

Customizing the fit couldn’t be easier. When the gun arrives it’ll be assembled with a factory length-of-pull of 13-inches and no-rise comb riser. So before you customize the fit, you’ll first break it down.

To do that, remove the two butt stock screws. All that takes is a Philips head screwdriver.

Next, remove the recoil pad and factory insert.

To remove the comb riser, slide it toward the back of the gun, then pull up (it's held in place by a series of 90-degree "hooks."

Once you’ve selected the proper length-of-pull and riser height, you do the same thing again, in reverse. If you can turn a screwdriver, you can customize this stock.

Helpful Hints

Tape the Spacers

There's a trick is selecting the right spacers and risers. Get a role of blue painters tape and use it to hold the spacers in place so you can shoulder the rifle and check the fit, adjusting as necessary. It's much easier than driving in the the fairly long screws over and over, and the painter's tape won't leave anything behind on the gun.

Figuring Fit

The comb risers increase in 1/8-increments. You want your cheek to rest naturally on the gun, with your dominate eye level to the scope.

If you can’t quite figure it out, mark the side of the scope’s eyepiece at the centerline, mount the rifle, and have a friend tell you whether your eye is in-line with the chalk mark or not.

Length-of-pull is more subjective. Savage suggests you try all the shims to see what is most comfortable, but generally speaking, the longer the arms, the more comfortable you’ll be with longer spacers.

Once you find the best-fitting shims, screw it all down. If the fit is good, but the eye-relief isn’t ideal, tweak the scope backward or forward in the rings until it’s right.