How to Replace a Recoil Spring on a Benelli Shotgun

Even the best guns have parts that wear out eventually. Put some spring back in your semi-auto Benelli with this easy tutorial.

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o matter how well it’s built, every machine has parts that eventually wear out. In the case of Benelli’s inertia-operated shotguns one such part is the recoil spring that cycles the bolt group. This spring is housed inside a tube hidden in the buttstock, and actuates the plunger at the heart of the semi. The repeated tension-release cycle eventually takes its toll, and can cause failures to feed over time.

Too strong a spring can also create issues for those throwing reduced-recoil loads, like skeet shooters or three-gun competitors, with the lower powder charges preventing the bolt from opening all the way. Luckily, the aftermarket offers both extra and reduced power replacement springs to make your Benelli function as it should. Choose the extra power models for heavy rounds like steel shot or turkey loads and reduced power for the low-recoil slugs that have become so prevalent on the three-gun course.

Total cost to upgrade your spring is around $15, and the project can be completed in about 20 minutes with simple hand tools. If you don’t have a specialty gun vice, pad the jaws on a bench vice with cardboard or wood scraps and give your favorite scattergun the love she deserves.

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Benelli shotguns with the Inertia Drive System include the Super Black Eagle II, M2 Field shotgun, Cordoba shotgun, SuperSport, Sport II, Legacy and Legacy Sport shotgun, Ultra Light shotgun, Montefeltro and Montefeltro Silver shotgun, M2 Tactical shotgun, and the M3 Convertible Semi-auto Pump shotgun.