Recently, an Army veteran who was convicted of having Glock pistol magazines in violation of New York’s state gun laws has managed to avoid prison time, but he’s not giving up the fight.

This story from guns.com says Simeon Mokhiber, 42, of Niagra Falls, was convicted on charges earlier this year stemming from violations of the state's magazine capacity limits imposed by the SAFE Act. In 2016, Mokhiber was stopped by police, who found three loaded Glock 17 magazines which exceeded the 10-round limit. He could have been sentenced to as much as 21 years in prison for three counts of third-degree criminal possession of a weapon, the story says.

Instead, Niagara County Judge Matthew Murphy this week handed down a sentence of 15 hours of community service and about $500 in fines and fees. Mokhiber said he plans to fight the conviction on the grounds that the SAFE Act is unconstitutional.

New York is certainly not the only state in the U.S. with limits on magazine capacity, and a national magazine ban has been proposed in the wake of the Las Vegas shooting on October 1. It can get kind of tough to keep track of.

Here’s a quick guide to the magazine restrictions in various states, important if you carry concealed and travel over state lines, and particularly important when traveling among the patchwork of states in the northeast and New England, where the laws are mostly restrictive and, sometimes, complex.

If a state is not listed below, it does not have any laws restricting magazine capacity.

NOTE: The following information in no way constitutes legal advice or guidance. Please consult your local laws and authorities.

States and Cities with Magazine Capacity Restrictions (UPDATED: 8/2/18)

California

Magazine Capacity Limit: 10 rounds

Law: PC 32310.

Details: The importation, sale of, and manufacturing of any magazines that hold more than 10 rounds, for any type of firearm, is illegal.

The importation, sale of, and manufacturing of any magazines that hold more than 10 rounds, for any type of firearm, is illegal. The law states that any “high-capacity” magazines possessed by state residents must be disposed of by being removed from the state, sold to a licensed firearms dealers, destroyed, or surrendered to law enforcement by July 1, 2017.

Colorado & Denver

Magazine Capacity Limit: 15 rounds

Law: Sec. 18-12-301.

Details: In addition to limiting detachable box magazines to 15 rounds, Colorado also limited tubular shotgun magazines to 28 inches and any detachable box magazine for a shotgun to eight rounds.

Tubular .22LR magazines are exempt, as are lever-action firearms.

Denver passed a 10-round magazine capacity limit that went into effect July 15. The city ordinance exempted law enforcement officials, members of the military, competitive shooters and people who hold federal firearm licenses.

Connecticut

Magazine Capacity Limit: 10 rounds

Details: The state bans any detachable "magazine, belt, feed strip, or similar device that has the capacity of, or can be readily restored or converted to accept more than 10 rounds of ammunition.

This doesn’t include permanently altered feeding devices, .22LR tube magazines, or the tube magazines on lever-action firearms.

If you move to Connecticut from another state and you already own mags that hold more than 10 rounds, you have 90 days to either render them inoperable, sell hem to a licensed gun dealer, or remove the magazine from the state. There is an exemption for military personnel.

If you were “…in lawful possession of a large capacity magazine and has been transferred into the state after January 1, 2014, may, within ninety days of arriving in the state, apply to the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection to declare possession of such large capacity magazine.”

If a magazine is declared and registered, it must be kept at the person’s residence or place of business (only if it isn’t loaded with more than 10 rounds), on the premises of a target range or on the premises of a licensed shooting club. It’s also permitted to be in possession of them while traveling to any of the above places.

The magazine laws and restrictions in Connecticut are numerous and complicated. You can read the entire bill here

Washington D.C.

Magazine Capacity Limit: 10 rounds

Law: D.C. Official Code § 7-2506.01

Details: "The District of Columbia prohibits the possession, sale or other transfer of any large capacity ammunition feeding device, regardless of whether the device is attached to a firearm. 'Large capacity ammunition feeding device' is defined as a magazine, belt, drum, feed strip, or similar device that has a capacity of, or that can be readily restored or converted to accept, more than 10 rounds of ammunition."

Hawaii

Magazine Capacity Limit: 10 rounds

Law: Haw. Rev. Stat. § 134-8(c).

Details: "The manufacture, possession, sale, barter, trade, gift, transfer, or acquisition of detachable ammunition magazines with a capacity in excess of ten rounds which are designed for or capable of use with a pistol is prohibited." This includes rifle magazines capable of use in any pistol, such as the AR-15, AK, M1 carbine, H&K carbine, Thompson, and aftermarket Ruger .22 magazines.

Illinois

Law: 430 ILCS 66 Section 90. Preemption.

Details:The regulation, licensing, possession, registration, and transportation of concealed handguns and ammunition for concealed handguns by licensees are exclusive powers and functions of the State. Any ordinance or regulation, or portion thereof, enacted on or before the effective date of this Act that purports to impose regulations or restrictions on licensees or concealed handguns and ammunition for concealed handguns in a manner inconsistent with this Act shall be invalid in its application to licensees under this Act on the effective date of this Act. This Section is a denial and limitation of home rule powers and functions under subsection (h) of Section 6 of Article VII of the Illinois Constitution. All local restrictions on Handguns are null and void. Local Governments can keep their restrictions on long guns and magazine bans for long guns.

(With new state preemption laws, these following limits would only apply to long guns.)

Aurora

Law: § 29-49

Magazine Capacity Limit: 15 rounds

Chicago

Law: 8-20-010 Definitions

Previous ordinances on the restrictions have been deleted and this section has all the restrictions for handguns and long guns in Chicago. The new preemption law voids all handgun restrictions in Illinois.

Franklin Park

Law: § 3-13G-3

Magazine Capacity Limit: 16 rounds

Oak Park

Law: §§ 27-2-1 and 27-1-2

Magazine Capacity Limit: 10 rounds

Riverdale

Law: Law: § 9.05.010, § 9.05.020 and § 9.05.030

Magazine Capacity Limit: 35 rounds

Maryland

Law: 4–301

Magazine Capacity Limit: 10 Rounds

Details: New restrictions went into effect on Oct. 1, 2013. Maryland law prohibits manufacture, sale, or transfer within the state of detached magazines of greater than 10-round capacity, but does not restrict possession of such magazines. The limit does not apply to tubular .22 caliber rifle magazines.

Massachusetts

Law: Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 140, § 121; Ch. 140, § 131M.

Magazine Capacity Limit: 10 rounds

Details: The sale, offering for sale, transfer or possession of large capacity feeding devices for assault weapons, is prohibited unless such device was lawfully possessed on September 13, 1994. Under Massachusetts law, a "large capacity feeding device" is defined as: "(i) a fixed or detachable magazine, box, drum, feed strip or similar device capable of accepting, or that can be readily converted to accept, more than ten rounds of ammunition or more than five shotgun shells; or (ii) a large capacity ammunition feeding device as defined in the federal Public Safety and Recreational Firearms Use Protection Act, 18 U.S.C. section 921(a)(31) as appearing in such section on September 13, 1994." Ch. 140, § 121. This does not include "an attached tubular device designed to accept, and capable of operating only with, .22 caliber ammunition."

Large capacity feeding devices designed for large capacity rifles and shotguns may be lawfully possessed by a holder of a Class A or B license to carry. Ch. 140, § 131(a), (b)(ii). Large capacity feeding devices designed for handguns may be possessed only by persons holding a Class A license to carry. Ch. 140, § 131(a).

New Jersey

Law: N.J. Rev. Stat § 2C:39-9h. N and § 2761

Magazine Capacity Limit: 10 rounds

Details: New Jersey law defines "large capacity ammunition magazine" as a box, drum, tube or other container which is capable of holding more than 10 rounds of ammunition to be fed continuously and directly into a semi-automatic firearm. New Jersey prohibits the manufacture, transport, shipment, sale or disposal of large capacity ammunition magazines, unless the magazine is intended to be used for authorized military or law enforcement purposes.

Exceptions to this law include:

“[A]n assault firearm pursuant to section 11 of P.L.1990, c.32 (C.2C:58-12) and the magazine is maintained and used in connection with participation in competitive shooting matches sanctioned by the Director of Civilian Marksmanship of the United States Department of the Army

—or—

[A] firearm with a fixed magazine capacity holding up to 15 rounds which is incapable of being modified to accommodate 10 or less rounds; or a firearm which only accepts a detachable magazine with a capacity of up to 15 rounds which is incapable of being modified to accommodate 10 or less rounds. One must register that firearm within one year from the new law’s enactment.

New York

Law: NY 265.00 23.

Magazine Capacity Limit: 10 rounds

Details: "Large capacity ammunition feeding device" means a magazine, belt, drum, feed strip, or similar device, that (A)Has a capacity of, or that can be readily restored or converted to accept, more than ten rounds of ammunition, OR (C) Is obtained after the effective date of the chapter of the Laws of two thousand thirteen which amended this subdivision and has a Capacity of, or that can be readily restored or converted to accept, More than ten rounds of ammunition; provided, however, that such term does not include an attached tubular device designed to accept, and Capable of operating only with, .22 caliber rimfire ammunition or a Feeding device that is a curio or relic.