Maine Governor Says Constitutional Carry Bill Unfair

Maine's Constitutional Carry Bill Stalled?
Gov. Paul LePage says he won't sign the bill with an amendment attached that limits its allowance of concealed carry to those who are 21 or older. Here, he displays his concealed weapons permit in a photograph released by his office via bangordailynews.com.Courtesy of governor's office

Recently we told you about a bill in Maine headed for the Governor's desk that would allow residents to carry concealed firearms without a permit. Now, Gov. Paul LePage says he won't sign it, according to this story on Noozaurus.com.

The problem: LePage says he's doesn't disagree with Constitutional Carry, but won't sign the bill because of an amendment that was tacked on when the legislation went through the state House. The amendment limits the legislation to only allow those over the age of 21 to carry without a permit.

When asked about the matter in a telephone interview with the WVOM radio station, LePage gave his reasons:

"The reason why is in my office I have a picture of Wade Slack, who got killed in Afghanistan protecting the freedom of the American people, and he was only 19," LePage said. "I think it's wrong to send out kids over to fight wars at 18, 19, and 20, abut they can't carry when they come home. I'm not buying into that," he said, according to this story on BangorDailyNews.com.

LePage has not said if he will veto the bill, which can become law without his signature if the House and Senate agree on a final version. The bill passed the House on Monday by an 83-62 vote. A vote on the bill, with the age restriction in it, was tabled in the Senate on Tuesday.

As the BDN article points out, Spec. Wade A. Slack was killed by enemy mortar fire on May 6, 2010 at the age of 21, according to his obituary.