The AR Quick-Shot Drill

There is a hierarchy of speed and movement that every shooter needs to factor in when approaching a series of targets. Your eyes can move faster than any other part of your body. The next quickest tools in your arsenal are your hands.photo from 3GunNation.com

Champion shooter Mike Voigt is scary fast on the trigger. And the reason for that is because he knows how to move fast the right way. Voigt puts it like this: “My eyes are very fast, my hands are okay, my body sucks, and my feet are terrible.”

What he is saying is that there is a hierarchy of speed and movement that every shooter needs to factor in when approaching a series of targets. Your eyes can move, process, and react to information faster than any other part of your body. The next quickest tools in your arsenal are your hands. Working with your eyes, your hands can shift and engage targets rapidly.

You start to lose time when you need to move your body around, such as when bending at the waist to shoot targets that are obscured by cover. But moving your body takes less time than repositioning yourself by moving your feet, which is the slowest way to engage targets.

Practice a Single-Shot Drill

This drill will teach you the fundamentals of stance, posture, and trigger control:

  1. Start with your rifle held in the low ready position, with the muzzle at a 45-degree angle pointing downward at the ground between you and the target. Place the butt of the rifle near the top of your shoulder.

  2. On the "up" command, raise the rifle in a smooth motion, and bring the sights up to your eyes without moving your head.

  3. As the rifle is coming in line with the target, flick the safety off and start applying pressure on the trigger, thus "loading" it. Continue to squeeze as your sights line up on target, breaking the shot as soon as the sight picture is correct.

Practice this with dry fire, followed by single live rounds at distances from 3 to 50 yards.