San Fran Proposes Another New Gun Law

In this May 12, 2015 photo, a San Francisco Police officer walks past a patrol car parked in San Francisco. The original charges were shocking enough: six San Francisco police officers were accused of stealing from suspects living in seedy residential hotels. Then federal prosecutors released racist, homophobic and ethnically insensitive email and text messages exchanged among more than a dozen officers, prompting the San Francisco district attorney to launch a wide-ranging investigation of the police department while considering dismissing up to 3,000 criminal cases involving the officers. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)Jeff Chiu

We reported recently on new laws in the city of San Francisco requiring gun sellers to record all gun and ammunition sales on video, and send information on those sales to police. Its inaction prompted the closing of High Bridge Arms, the city's only gun shop.

Now, a proposal has been made to ban the storage of firearms in any unattended vehicle within the city limits, unless they are secured in a lock box affixed to the vehicle or in the vehicle's trunk, but only if the automatic release lever is disabled, according to this story from the San Francisco Examiner.

Proponents of the ordinance say it will help curb recent vehicle break-ins in San Francisco, where firearms have been stolen and used in crimes.

If approved, it will be the first such law in California. The story says there were 10,000 guns stolen in California in 2012.

The proposal originated after a gun was stolen from a law-enforcement agent's vehicle and used in a homicide in July. The legislation was originally limited to off-duty law-enforcement officers, but it has been expanded to apply to anyone in city limits.

This story from NBC says an investigation by the station found that 500 firearms have gone missing from eight Bay Area law-enforcement agencies since 2010.

In June, a U.S. circuit Court of Appeals upheld a San Francisco ordinance that requires handgun owners to lock their guns up in their homes and another ordinance banning hollow-point ammunition in the city.

Earlier this month, campus police working for the City College of San Francisco, guarding its 11 "gun-free" campuses and 80,000 students, pleaded with the college to allow them to be armed, after they were unable to adequately respond to the threat of a man with a gun in a library on October 14, as they were armed with only pepper spray and batons. They had to wait for armed police to arrive before they could even enter the building. Luckily, the shooter escaped and no one was injured.

In June, a U.S. circuit Court of Appeals upheld a San Francisco ordinance that requires handgun owners to lock their guns up in their homes and another ordinance banning hollow-point ammunition in the city.