Washington AG Announces Move to Ban 'Assault Rifles'

Washington AG Announces Move to Ban 'Assault Rifles'
Washington state Attorney General Bob Furguson.web photo

Echoing recent events in Massachusetts, Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson has called on the state legislature to ban "assault weapons."

According to this story from The News Tribune, Ferguson said this week he hopes such a ban could prevent mass shootings like the one that claimed the life of three people recently in Mukilteo, Washington. Christopher Ivanov, 19, told investigators afterward he was angry that his ex-girlfriend, Anna Bui, was moving on after their break-up.

Ivanov shot and killed Bui along with Jordan Ebner and Jacob Long with an AR-platform rifle.

The ban would outlaw the sale of AR-15 rifles and "other assault weapons" in the state and would place a magazine capacity limit of 10 rounds. The state currently has no limit on magazine capacity.

State residents who own rifles on the new ban list would be grandfathered in if the law passes. The story says supporters still haven’t decided exactly how they will define which guns will be banned.

In this story from kiro7.com, Diana Pinto, the owner of Pinto's Gun Shop, said the guns may be getting banned for the wrong reasons.

"They look bad, they look scary. And so that's what they kind of hone in on, when they don't realize that again, there's a lot of firearms out there that maybe don't look as scary, but they're just as deadly. They can have as many rounds," she said in the story.

Pinto said the focus should be on preventing those with mental illness from possessing firearms.

"If they can't get an assault weapon, they would probably get something else, which is horrible. But stop that person from getting something – not just limiting access to one avenue," Pinto said in the story.

A national “assault weapon” ban was in place from 1994 to 2004 along with a magazine capacity limit of 10 rounds, but there was deemed to be no significant impact on gun crime or homicide rates and the ban was allowed to expire under the George W. Bush administration.